Bloomin’ Lovely

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Just look at this perfect specimen! Well, so far so good; my first and only Redlove apple. I just hope it continues to thrive and I eventually get to eat it, as it has been nurtured and cared for when I should have sacrificed it for the sake of the tree.

I suppose July and August are the times when you should be able to sit back and enjoy the fruits of your labours and we’ve certainly had the weather for it. We have enjoyed cabbages, which I have decided to harvest young as they taste much nicer. We have had a good crop of strawberries but they seem to have come to an end now. There is nothing nicer than going outside first thing in the morning to collect a handful of juicy blueberries to throw on your breakfast cereal.

By the way, if you click the images, you will get a bigger picture.

I just love this oriental poppy although it doesn’t hang around for long and the flowers end up a soggy mush if you’re not quick to catch them before they fall.

It looks like a delicious frothy dessert sitting on a matching saucer. Last year I planted some ladybird poppies and I am hoping that they will make an appearance again this year. There are a few smaller plants dotted around and I am hoping they turn out to be them.

This is my gorgeous Peaches and Cream hollyhock, given to me by my good friend and gardening guru Raewyn. I love the contrast of the fluffy, frilliness of these flowers compared to the openness of the cream hollyhock (see previous post). They have all been hit by rust but it hasn’t affected their floral display. I have another hollyhock which is yet to flower; I think it is a deep red one.

I spent this morning digging out lilies from the shady corner and planted 6 gaura, Whirling Butterflies and 2 Siskiyou Pink. I should have had 6 of each but they got held up in the post and some didn’t survive. It is my intention to put some hostas in the corner with the heucheras.

The following three images go along the back border:

Here we have the apple tree, sambucus, agapanthus, dahlia, salvia “Wendy’s Wish”, cosmos, “Swan Lake” rose and cream hollyhock… …leading on to the buddleja, eryngium, corydalis flexuosa, lots more cosmos and the new rhododendron “Rainbow” and centaurea montana… …after the hibiscus comes more dahlia, heucheras, poppies and pansies. The jasmine “Clotted Cream” is flowering quietly behind them all.
The nicotiana are growing well and seem to have produced these huge green leaves almost overnight. The osteospernum continue to delight and short-stemmed lilies with the long stems contine to produce some beautiful flowers. The tomatoes are now going from strength to strength in their lovely self-watering pots. The flowers are just beginning to appear. The blueberries are slowly turning purple, just enough each day for breakfast! These are my patio pots containing my favourite dahlia (I don’t know its name though), amaranthus “Greenthumb” and “Foxtail” and artemisia. The amaranthus spikes are soft and furry.

I am concerned that my potatoes haven’t flowered yet and the foliage is collapsing. The peas continue to fatten but I am never sure when to pick them as it will take a fair few to make a meal. The beetroot are probably about right for picking now before they get too big. The celery is doing well and we have only a few cabbages left. The salad leaves have just about finished and I don’t think I will sow any more just yet. The nasturtiums make a nice border to the raised bed but I haven’t tried eating them yet.

And finally, my poor neglected hanging baskets are beautiful despite intermittant watering from me.

All change

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Dissatisfied with the left border, I bribed Raewyn with home made scones and jam to come and cast her expert eye over it. I just keep sticking plants in wherever there is a spare inch of soil, giving no thought to how big things will grow or how everything will fit together. Raewyn sat pondering with pencil and paper and rearranged the whole left border and some of the main border.  The trouble with friends with an expert eye is that they leave you with lots of work to do!  Having spent all weekend in the blazing sun digging, uprooting, planting and watering. The Festuca glauca ‘Elijah Blue’ has been gathered from around the garden and planted together in a feathery fountain. The astilbe was really unhappy at the lower level so has now been planted in the deeper soil of the higher level.  I am now much happier with the overall appearance which will be finished off with an architectural angelica archangelica at the back.

First of all I got rid of all the winter pansies that had brought so much pleasure in the early months but were now past their best. I dug out great swathes of crocosmia that was crowding out so much all over the garden and even found some things I forgot I had.

August 2010 May 2011 July 2011

Unfortunately, I managed to knock the one flower off the red rose, let’s hope there are more where that came from. Now the crocosmia has gone from the main border, the beautiful salvia “Wendy’s Wish” has been brought forward into the sunshine and looks lovely with the dark red dahlia.

The front rockery is completely out of hand. I made a big mistake planting so much cosmos all over the garden; I didn’t realise how dense the feathery foliage would be. The artemisia has really spread out and made itself at home and the aliums tower above slowly turning from green to purple. However, the smaller candy stripe cosmos has worked well with the anenomes in the dividing border.

May 2011 July 2011

Although most of the leaves were covered in red rust spots and were removed, the hollyhock flowers are rather majestic.

The veg have been enjoying the sunshine and quietly getting on with the business of growing. The cabbages are huge and one provides 3 or 4 meals. Now I have removed some of the bigger ones, the later ones have more room to grow. The salad leaves are lovely and enjoyed by the whole family and neighbours alike. I keep nibbling on the peapods and some have developed the sweetest tasting peas. The carrots have encouraging foliage although I haven’t investigated further and the onions are pushing themselves up out of the ground; much more successful than last year.

What a difference a break makes

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Have just returned from a wonderful holiday at Abhainn Ri luxury cottages in County Wicklow. Despite my concerns, the garden seems to have thrived without me. I got the feeling that it was rather relieved to have a break from my fussing and apart from the hanging baskets looking a bit sorry for themselves, everything seems to have continued to flourish.

This morning I harvested my first bowl of strawberries with the promise of many more to come.

The apples are developing nicely although I wonder if there are too many and that maybe I should sacrifice a few to benefit the others.

 This is my one tiny Redlove apple which I haven’t got the heart to remove.

You can hardly see the tiny buddleja ‘Buzz’ which got held up in the post when we were away on holiday. At least it looks as if it might survive which is more than can be said for the other sorry specimen which I have put in a pot.

 
This tangled mess is the raised bed containing leeks and onions.  I am so proud of my lovely cabbages. They are not developing firm hearts but I am not sure when they will be ready to eat.
 The peas have gone mad and the covers have been removed to allow for pollination of the flowers.  There are plenty of salad leaves for us to feast on and the celery is coming along nicely.
I am really worried about my poor sickly tomatoes. They have been fed and kept watered but they are just not happy. I have grown them from seed; maybe I should have just bought plants?  
 Short-stemmed lilies
 Amaranthus and dahlia

A Guided Tour

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I’ve been unusually unbusy in the garden this week. The rain over the past couple of days has been very welcome and seems to have roused the garden  from its sunbathing stupour. Everything is fresher and more alert.

I’ve had another seed disaster with Nicotiana and Oenothera, neither of which has germinated. Some seedlings appeared but I am sure they have wafted in while the trays were outside in the sunshine. Both have been sown again and I am going to keep them indoors until they germinate, or until I learn to recognise plants from weeds, whichever is sooner! Of course it’s back to the fridge with the Oenothera for the next four weeks. Sowed some purple and white honesty that came free with my magazine along with the free WHITE sunflowers.

As I haven’t done much this week I thought I would just do a progress report around the garden so hang on to your hollyhocks as the saying goes. Speaking of hollyhocks…

The apple tree is looking much healthier this year, I only got 5 apples on it last year. Most of the blossom has gone now and I’m sure I can see some tiny apples forming, or it could just be wishful thinking!

The Redlove apple tree is also looking splendid with its rosy foliage. Even if it wasn’t going to provide me with juicy apples, it would still be a very attractive tree. The blossom was the deepest pink although there was only a tuft at the top and on one of the branches. Lorra says I shouldn’t allow it to fruit this year but I think the temptation of producing an apple with red flesh might be too much to resist.  
This is the first aquilegia I planted and was kindly donated from my sister, Charlotte. I spend much of my time pulling up the seedlings (these ones I do recognise) but they are so pretty I have allowed them to spread into other areas of the garden. I even shook a seedhead under the silver birch tree last autumn to fill a space and the seedlings are dependably flourishing there.Now I have two more lovely aquilegia to keep me busy.  
 I am so disappointed with the giant aliums this year. Although I now have 5, increased from the original and huge 3, they are very much reduced in size.  
This is the black leafed dahlia I thought I had lost, it took ages to show any sign of life this year. I don’t know its name but I am very fond of its dark foliage which forms the perfect backdrop for the profusion of bright yellow flowers which continue until the first frost. I think I bought it after a trip to RHS Tatton. I’m not sure how it will fare in a pot, I’ve always put it in the garden in the past where it’s had lots of room to expand.
 In the foreground is my magnolia stellata which was free except for postage. I was very disappointed when my little twig arrived but, although it’s still not much more than a twig, I am happy that it has some lovely, healthy  leaves and I am sure it will be stunning when it grows up.The short-stemmed lilies in the background were also free with one of my numerous orders. I gave some to dad and put the others in this pot. They look like little palm trees.  
I am very fond of this purple geranium and its abundant flowers pouring over the edge of the garden. I didn’t know I liked geraniums as I had only met pelargoniums before and wasn’t keen on them. When Raewyn told me I needed one in my garden I was none too pleased. Now I have two! Now I know I said I wasn’t going to buy any more plants but I do have another 4 geraniums on order and I am hoping they will arrive later this month. My new hellebore can just be seen peering out between the winter pansies which have also sprung into life. I had started to remove the pansied as I put in more plants but now they look at me with their little faces and I haven’t the heart to take them out.  
I am so pleased with the new rose, Swan Lake. It looks so radiant with its glossy new perfect leaves. I am concerned that it is a bit overcrowded by the sambucus.
I was very concerned about the sambucus when I planted it last year. It seemed to get lost and couldn’t really be seen among the other plants but this year it has come back with a flourish. I love plants with dark foliage and these feathery leaves sway so rhythmically in the slightest breeze.
I had a thing about grass last year and bought this rye grass at RHS Tatton against Jean’s advice. I put it in a pot as I didn’t want it to run riot. It didn’t do much last year but it seems to be making more of an effort at present. I am hoping it will soon throw up some flower spikes so I can justify my purchase.

Well, that’s the flowers, now for the fruit and veg.

I just wanted to introduce you to my little scarecrow who sits in the raised veg bed encouraging everything to grow. He hasn’t got a name but has been known to pop up in another part of the garden. Strange that this only seems to happen when my younger sister, Lorra, has paid me a visit!

I remember sitting on the patio last year and eating blueberries straight from the bush. Can there be anything more pleasing than that? The flowers are all but gone now, replaced by a blue haze with such promise.
I had some lovely beetroots last year although I think I cooked them too long – about 3 days I think! I am hoping for a good harvest this year and have thinned them out a little but I try not to disturb things too much, preferring to sow thinly in the first place.
I feel I have struggled with these cabbages this year but have you ever seen a more perfect specimen? Not a nibble or a blemish on their perfect leaves. I am convinced now that the initial failure was due to my heavy handedness when transplanting from tray to soil. I am keeping my fingers crossed that they continue to develop without further mishap.  
The carrots have now got proper leaves and seem happy. Again I have sowed thinly because, according to Monty Don, a carrot fly can smell a disturbed plant from half a mile away. This is just one section of the bag. The section on the right is where the cat like to jump in a leave deposits but my ‘cane garden’ seems to have stopped it in its tracks and even the disturbed seedlings are finding their way to the light. I will plant up the two remaining sections as soon as I get round to it.
It took a good few hours to prick out these lovely little celery seedlings. Celery anyone?
The potatoes seemed to take a while to get going but now they are positively rampant! The compost is almost up to the top of the bags. Admittedly, I have fed them this year with potato fertilizer so here’s hoping for a bumper crop.
I am so pleased with my peas after the disastrous start. No one ever told me what a ‘pea stick’ was so I’ve just used twigs I have found under the trees in the garden and they seem to be doing the trick. They are so pretty, I hope I haven’t planted them too close together.
The raspberries are growing well under the tree. Some of the leaves of the sickly one that was removed died back but it seems to be surviving. I will have to think about supports for them soon.
I sowed these salad leaves about a week ago and can’t believe they’ve come up so quickly. Another couple of weeks and they will be on the dinner plate!
The strawberries are looking good and have had many flowers. The three plants in the top of the planter are last year’s main plants, the rest are the runners.

Cabbages and Cats

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Only 4 of my original 9 cabbages remain. I blame myself as I can’t see any evidence of them having been nibbled. I think I must have damaged the stems as I planted them in the soil as the stems are just sheered off. The remaining 4 seem to be quite sturdy now and 11 new ones have been transplanted from tray to soil. The beetroots have been thinned out and some ‘cut and come again’ salad leaves sown.

I must have been too keen when planting my peas as the new ones are now growing and look healthy enough. Lorra brought me a little scarecrow who now sits watching over them with his little sign which says ‘grow seeds, grow!’

A cat seems to have taken a liking to my carrot bag and has on several occasions jumped into it and left several deposits. The young seedlings have been thrown around on several occasions now and I am hoping that the canes I have ‘planted’ will dissuade it from using my carrot bag as a toilet.

It took me nearly all day to prick out what seemed like a million leeks, I didn’t realise how reliably they would germinate. I have managed to give some away so I won’t have to plant them all into the soil. The pots at the front are Cosmos Sensation.

Most of the dahlias have pushed out new leaves and have been planted in the back of the border, just need to remember to buy some plant supports for them. For a while it didn’t look as if my black leafed dahlia was going to make an appearance but I needed to be more patient, it just took a little longer than the red ones.

Flowers are starting to appear on the strawberries.

It is very kind of J Parkers to send me free gifts but don’t they know I haven’t got any room left? Two free camellia ‘Lady Campbell’ and ‘Debbie’ are in pots and 6 free echinacea are still waiting. I found good homes for the 100 gladioli!

6 verbena bonariensis have replaced those lost over the winter.

The orchid continues to flourish.

The Mystery of the Missing Peas

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Decided to have a poke around in the peas to see if I could find any sign of more shoots but I didn’t find a single pea apart from the two that have already emerged! Where have they gone? There are no signs of anything having dug them up. Have sowed another two rows.

 

The tulips continue to delight me, gleaming like jewels in the beautiful sunshine. The darker ones flowered a little later in the back garden than the apricots which is why I thought I had planted one colour in the back and one in the front. Strange that it was the dark ones that opened first in the front garden even though they are all facing the same direction.

 Spent a lovely day at Ness Botanical Gardens in Neston, Merseyside. I can’t believe that it’s only 40 minutes away and I have never been. Of course, there’s no visiting a garden centre without making a purchase.I found this tiny tulip but all it says on the label is ‘tulipa specie’ which is not very helpful. It’s not looking its best in this photo. The spiky petalled flowers open up in the sunshine and close up again when it’s dull; it’s really pretty.  
 This picture was taken at Ness Gardens and shows the mass of Summer Snowdrops growing under a tree.  
 This is mine!  
  I love the little green dots around the edges of each bell’ ‘.
 The lovely weather encouraged much activity in the garden this weekend and the Jasmine ‘Clotted Cream’ was finally planted. I stole the trellis from a clematis which meant another trip to the garden centre to replace it. I didn’t even know it was 20% off weekend so I had to make the most of it!We saw these Primula Denticulata at Ness but they were quite expensive so I was thrilled to get them at a bargain price along with some scraggy yellow primula from the bargain bench, left over from Mother’s Day.  
  I also purchased a Spiraea Arguta and planted it in the top of the front rockery and an obilisk and some sweet pea seeds ‘Elegant Ladies’.We put some of the new trellis against the front fence and made an effort to untangle the poor clematis that was clinging desperately to itself. The convolvulus was removed as I accepted that it really hadn’t survived the winter.I can hardly believe the difference in the Aubretia in aweek.  
The blossom is out on the grafted apple tree and gone from the damson.
This corydalis flexuosa is one of my favourites.Finally this weekend I sowed some Nicotiana, ‘Tinkerbell’ and ‘Lime Green’ and the sweet peas. I can see signs of my second batch of cabbages.

 

An Extra Hour

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It’s amazing what a difference a few sunny days will make and now that the clocks have moved back, I am looking forward to lots of productive evenings to come.

I now have two beautiful flowers on my orchid which I am very pleased about and lots of buds yet to open. To think I was going to send it off to the great compost heap in the sky!

The plants around the round patio don’t seem too upset by the dousing they got from my jet-washing. I have been down on my hands and knees removing the old cement and filling in the holes. The Pave Fix Plus takes 4 days to ‘cure’ but I don’t think that includes the days when it’s been pouring down. Steve jet-washed the decking and the furniture ready for the teak oil but I think I’ll wait until it stops raining.

There are now 9 cabbages emerging under cover but I’m not sure at what stage to transplant them into the soil. I intend to sow some more soon, still with an eye on a successional harvest.

I opened the flaps of the PVC covers when the sun was shining to let some air flow through then closed them again at night.

Have planted 5 sacks of Kestrel potatoes.

I’m not quite sure why I only have one pea plant (or possibly two) but I am certain there are some signs of beetroots.

I have to say, I am very pleased with the colour arrangement of these narcissi and tulips. I wish I could say it was intentional but I bought a mixed bag of apricot and purple tulips and it seems that I have planted the purple ones in the front and the apricot ones in the back; what are the chances of that?

My unhappy camellia is still unhappy and the leaves are turning yellow. I may just have to admit defeat. On a positive note, the zinnia are still alive!

I have ordered lots of plants and seeds with ambitious plans for gorgeous pots as seen in the Gardener’s World magazine! Well, I’m off to put my Oenothera ‘Sunset Boulevard’ (evening primrose) in the fridge.

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